Can Men and Women be Just FRIENDS?

Actually yes, men and women can be friends. I haven’t watched JHMS so I won’t speak on that but I’ll tell you what I’ve learned empirically.

Men and women can be best of friends. They grow close together so fast, it’s amazing.

Sometimes it happens that one of the two starts developing some feelings for the other that makes them cross the line. As long as this situation is not developing, men and women can be badass friends.

Since I have always believed in this theory, I’ve never developed such feelings for my girl-friends.

Contrary to the Indian belief and common saying of Hasi To Phasi (You are set of she laughs) I have always believed that if a girl is laughing around you, that doesn’t necessarily mean that she’s interested in taking things to the next level or pitching sex there. It just means that she wants to be friends with you as well. This is what I believe though.

I would be lying if I say the otherwise hasn’t happened to me. Sometimes, even with me, it has happened that I grew close to a girl with the believe that we’re good friends but later on, it turned out that she was infatuated or had a crush. When these things first happened, things went south for that friendship. A lot of my friendships have been ruined because of this. We were so close. I almost miss them.

But, to answer your questions, yes, they can be friends!

I have too many girl-friends!

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5 Lessons People Most Often Learn Too Late in Life

  1. Life is short. Everyone knows the end is inevitable but few realize how close we are the day we are born. Realizing “Life is Short” will promote the appropriate sense of urgency. Start your bucket list at birth if you want to complete it. You only have one life and there’s not much time left in it.
  2. Get it Done Young. The sooner you accomplish your goals, the longer you can reap the rewards. Graduating college at 40 leaves fewer years to enjoy the salary increase. Buying a house young, pay it off earlier. Children, the sooner you have them the more time you get with them.
  3. Take Care of Your Body. The aging process will wreak havoc on your body regardless. Don’t assist the process with bad habits like smoking, drinking, overeating and avoiding exercise.
  4. Start Saving Money Early. Compound interest is your best friend but you have to start early to make it work. The Concept Of Compounding. If you save $50 per month at age 21, with a modest 5% interest rate, you will have about $80,000 at age 60. If you start at 39, you will have half as much.
  5. The Things that Matter Most Won’t for Long! This is a hard lesson. That band you start at 18 will be forgotten by age 25. That company you devote your life to will lay you off at the drop of a hat. I cannot stress enough this lesson. That BMW will eventually be worthless. When you are 50 it will not matter what you drove at 35. You cannot buy enough stuff that doesn’t matter to make you happy. Try to make every decision after answering, “Does it REALLY matter?”

5 Yearly Check-Ups All Women Should Have

A woman’s health depends on a lot of factors. Every woman should make time for healthy habits — regular exercise, stress management, choosing the right foods — and she should also be scheduling routine health screenings so potential problems can be spotted early. In fact, health screenings can make keeping tabs on your health simple.

So what screenings should you be getting? These 5 are a good start.

1. Blood pressure screening. Starting at age 18, every woman needs to have her blood pressure checked at least every two years. This health screening involves wrapping a cuff around the arm and pumping it up tightly. Ideal blood pressure for women is less than 120/80 mmHg (millimeters of mercury). If your insurance doesn’t cover a blood pressure screening (though most insurance companies do), check into free screenings in your community.

2. Cholesterol check. Women should have their cholesterol checked at least every five years starting at about age 20. This screening is important for decreasing your risk of heart disease, and can be done at your doctor’s office or at a lab with a doctor’s order, as the test only involves drawing a blood sample. Some community health fairs offer quick cholesterol screenings, involving nothing but a finger-prick. If you get a high reading on this screening test, you will be referred to your doctor for more complete testing. The ideal level is below 200 mg/dL (milligrams per deciliter) for total cholesterol.

3. Pap smears and pelvic exams. Beginning at age 21, or earlier if you are sexually active, women need to have a pelvic exam and Pap smear every two years to check for any abnormalities in the reproductive system. Guidelines for this cervical cancer screening recently changed from once a year, as studies found no benefit to such frequent screenings. Barring any problems, women age 30 and older only need a Pap smear every three years if they have had three normal tests in a row. To take the Pap smear, a speculum is placed inside the vagina to widen the vaginal canal, and your doctor uses a small tool to take cells from the cervix to detect any cell changes that can lead to cervical cancer. Your doctor can also screen for sexually transmitted diseases.

4. Mammograms and breast exams. Starting around age 20, women should have a clinical breast exam at least every three years until age 40, when this should be done annually, according to most experts. This is a manual exam — your doctor uses her fingers to examine the breasts for any lumps or abnormalities. A mammogram is a screening test for breast cancer and involves applying moderate compression to the breasts so that X-ray images can be captured. Mammograms are done every one or two years beginning at age 40. (The United States Preventive Services Task Force recommends mammograms beginning at age 50, but the American Cancer Society still recommends earlier screening.)

5. Bone density screen. Women should start getting screened for osteoporosis with a bone density test at age 65. Women with risk factors for osteoporosis, such as having a slender frame or a fractured bone, should be screened earlier. For this test, you lie on the table while a scanning machine takes X-ray images of certain bones in your body. Healthy bones show a T-score (the measurement used to describe your bone density) of -1 or higher. The frequency of this health screening varies from woman to woman based on bone density and risk factors.