How To Get From JFK to Manhattan (Step-by-Step VIDEO)

How To Get From JFK to Manhattan (Step-by-Step VIDEO)

Are you flying to New York City soon and don’t know how to get from JFK International Airport to Manhattan? In this video, I present three different options to get from the airport to Manhattan: Taxi, Long Island Railroad (LIRR), and the Subway.
I go step by step through the process of taking the Airtrain to the Subway and then taking that all the way to Times Square. If you have any questions, leave me a comment!

Video by Jacob Carlson

20 Secrets To Booking Cheap Flights in 2017

20 Secrets To Booking Cheap Flights in 2017

Booking cheap flights today is almost like a science. You may see a good rate in the morning, and within a few hours it can quickly double in price. In fact, airlines often fluctuate their prices throughout the day to help fill empty seats.

As a frequent traveler and having handled the corporate travel bookings at my previous job, I’ve picked up a few travel tricks and money-saving hacks along the way.

Here are 23 secrets to booking cheap flights.

 

1. Plan ahead and be patient

20 Secrets To Booking Cheap Flights in 2017

Planning ahead is the first step in finding cheap flights. That doesn’t mean you won’t be able to find last minute discounts, but you’ll have more options and flexibility to score cheap flights when you plan ahead.

This means that if you wish to travel in spring, you should start checking prices in the fall or winter season.

Tips for planning ahead:

  • Check travel websites for prices first thing every morning (around 9:00am) and in the evening (after 6:00pm).
  • Sign up for email alerts. I like using Skyscanner for this tool as this allows me to see how the price fluctuates (up or down) and know when the cheapest fight is available.
  • Start your search three months before your trip. As a general guideline, the cheapest flights can be found at least 47 days before the departure date.

 

2. Search incognito

Always search for flights in incognito or private browsing mode to get the lowest price.

Sometimes there is no difference in price when searching in incognito mode, however I always recommend comparing rates before booking your flight.

 

3. Search tickets one at a time

Even if you’re traveling with a group, sometimes airlines can sell multiple airfare classes at different prices.

For example, if you’re traveling as a pair and there is only one seat left in the lowest fare class, the website will usually show the highest fare class for both tickets.

However if you search each ticket separately, the website may show a cheaper rate. This can help at least one person – if not both of you – save money on your flights.

 

4. Delete your browser history and cookies

20 Secrets To Booking Cheap Flights in 2017

You’re not crazy if you’ve seen the price of a flight change after searching it a few times. Travel websites and airlines will remember your search, and this might cause prices to actually increase.

Always delete your browser history and cookies before searching for flights. Your best bet is to search in incognito or private browsing mode (as mentioned in tip #2).

 

5. Check the airline’s direct website

While third party travel websites can be great, sometimes the best unadvertised deals are found directly on the airline’s website.

 

6. Join the email list of your favorite airline and third party travel website

I recommend signing up for email promotions offered through your preferred airline and third party travel website. This allows you to receive special offers as soon as they go live online or exclusive offers for email subscribers.

 

7. Check departures/ arrivals from alternative airports

20 Secrets To Booking Cheap Flights in 2017

Some major cities have multiple airports within close proximity. For example, New York City has three main airports which visitors can choose from: LGA, JFK and EWR.

Prices can vary significantly based on which airport you choose, so it’s important to always compare rates.

One thing to keep in mind though is to determine if flying into an alternative airport is worth the savings.

For example, if you’re traveling to New York City and fly into EWR, you will have to pay for New Jersey transit (or taxi) to get to Manhattan.

The savings that you got from flying into EWR may quickly disappear by the time you factor in the ground transportation costs to get into Manhattan.

 

8. Follow airlines and third party travel websites on Social Media

One of the great features about social media is that airlines can use these platforms to share special travel promotions with their followers.

Sometimes an airline will offer a special promotion code through their Twitter or Facebook page, so it’s important to follow along with them online.

 

9. Bundle your flights, hotel and car rental

Bundling your trip on websites like Expedia can help you save up to $300. These savings can provide more room in your travel budget for sightseeing, entertainment, dining out and shopping.

 

10. Or don’t bundle your flights, hotel and car rental

While great deals can be found when you bundle your trip, sometimes this is not always the case. Always compare prices to determine if bundling or booking separately is more cost effective.

 

11. Mix and match airlines

20 Secrets To Booking Cheap Flights in 2017

Sometimes booking a round trip or multi-city trip with the same airlines can save you money, however this is not always the rule.

Always compare prices to determine if you’re getting the cheapest flight when you book with one airlines vs. multiple airlines.

The easiest method to compare prices is using a third party website, such as Skyscanner, which will list the cheapest flight combination for your chosen dates.

 

12. Fly on the cheapest day of the week

Traveling on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Saturdays are usually the cheapest days of the week. Also, searching mid-week for flights produces the best deals too.

From my personal experience, I also find that Thursday can sometimes offer a good price as well.

Days that tend to be the most expensive are Mondays, Fridays and sometimes Sundays. Airlines know that most business trips take place between Monday and Friday, which is why it tends to be more expensive to depart Monday and return on Friday.

However, business travelers have started to recently fly out on Sunday, rather than Monday to try and get a better rate on airfare, but this isn’t always the case.

13. Fly during off-peak hours

Sure you may already know that flying after 8:00pm is usually cheaper than flying during the day. But you can also score a deal by taking an early morning flight as well (between 5:00am and 7:00am).

 

14. Fly indirect

While nonstop flights are usually preferred, sometimes you can save a significant amount by choosing a 1-stop flight.

A 1-stop flight may also give you more options.

For example, I just recently booked flights to Victoria, BC and the only direct flight from Toronto arrives late at night. Instead, I picked a 1-stop flight that arrives in Victoria by noon, which also saved me over $100.

You may also decide to choose a flight with a long layover, which can allow you to explore the city as an added bonus.

 

15. Fly during the shoulder or off-season

Flying during the shoulder or off-season can lead to significant savings.

I was able to score a great 7-day vacation package to Paris in February for only $1,000 CAD (which included flights, hotel and taxes).

This was a lot more affordable than traveling during the summer months and traveling during the off-season tends to be less busy too—which is a win-win for me.

The take-home point is to be flexible with your travel dates, as prices can fluctuate significantly throughout the seasons.

 

16. Save money on checked baggage

Most airlines now charge you $25 each way to check your luggage, and they will also charge you extra if it’s over the weight limit.

You can avoid this by packing lightly and wearing your heavier items on the plane.

If you’re traveling with a close friend or significant other, consider sharing a suitcase with them. This can save you $50 together on baggage costs ($25 each way).

Another option is to bring carry-on luggage only if you’re going on a short trip, such as a weekend getaway. Most hotels offer basic toiletries, and you can bring travel-sized items with you on the plane (provided they meet the TSA liquid guidelines).

 

17. Bring your own food

20 Secrets To Booking Cheap Flights in 2017

Many airlines now charge for food on board. Save money by bringing your own snacks from home instead of buying them on the plane. I promise that your own food will taste a lot better too.

 

18. Shop around for travel & health insurance

I always recommend having travel or (extra) health insurance for your trip, however the one offered when you book your flights isn’t always the best rate.

Sometimes your work place might offer travel or health coverage, which is included in your benefits package.

You can also purchase insurance through your bank for the year — which is what I currently do.

Since I travel multiple times per year, an annual insurance plan is more cost effective for me (instead of having to pay separately for each trip).

If you are over 40 years old (or have a history of health issues), I recommend purchasing extra health coverage (even if you’re already covered through work).

Unfortunately we can never predict what might happen while we’re traveling, which is why it’s always important to be prepared.

 

19. Avoid paying for seat selection (if possible)

While advanced seat selection is sometimes included in your airfare, some airlines charge a fee to select your seats.

Unless you’re particular about where you sit on the plane, I recommend skipping this step when booking your flights.

Instead, check-in 24 hours before your flight, which allows you to make your seat selection for free.

 

20. Sign up for a frequent flier program

Frequent flier programs are great for scoring free flights and upgrades.

Even if you’re not a frequent flier I recommend signing up for an airline rewards program. You can earn points by shopping at partner stores, taking advantage of special email offers (sign up for their newsletter) and by flying of course.

Legroom Seems to Get Smaller on Each Flight, Are You Getting Your Money’s Worth?

WIRE TELEGRAM: It seems like the legroom on each flight gets smaller and smaller each trip. Do we have to be rich to travel? Whether you’re in it for the long haul or short haul, there’s no denying that flying is largely about the constant quest for comfort. One factor that’s sure to make or break your flight is how much space you have, as the amount of legroom available to you often decides whether or not you’re able to stretch your legs, work on your laptop during your flight or even eat with ease using your tray table.

READ MORE: How to Travel When You’re Not Rich

The fact of the matter is that legroom inches have been gradually disappearing in recent years, prompting the development of new products intended to help protect our space and even the occasional in-flight legroom spat. But not all airlines are created equal when it comes to legroom, so we’ve put together this airline legroom for major U.S. and Canadian airlines to help break it down for you.

To measure how much legroom a seat offers, the industry uses a term called the “seat pitch.” The seat pitch measures the distance from the headrest of one seat to the headrest behind it, offering an idea of how much room a passenger can expect.

Because airlines are constantly updating their cabins and fleets, the figures listed below are subject to change. Still, this guide offers up a general idea of how much legroom to expect on your next flight.

United Airlines

Standard seat pitch: The standard seat pitch on the majority of United Airlines and United Express aircraft is 31 inches. On most planes, standard seats recline between 2 and 5 inches.

Standard seat width: Standard seats are up to 18 inches wide.

Upgraded legroom options: Passengers who want additional legroom during a United flight can upgrade to the Economy Plus seat class, which offers up to 5 additional inches of legroom in the main cabin. For domestic flights, United First Class offers seat pitches of up to 39 inches with up to 7.5 inches of recline and up to 24 inches of seat width. International flights offer two upgraded class options: United Global First and United Business First. Both offer up to 78 inches of sleeping space with lie-down seats that recline 180-degrees. Global First seats are up to 23 inches wide, while Business First seats are up to 22 inches wide.

Delta Airlines

Standard seat pitch: Delta’s wide-body jets have a standard seat pitch of 31 or 32 inches, while most of the airline’s narrow-body jets have standard seat pitches of 31 to 33 inches.

Standard seat width: Standard seat width throughout the Delta Airlines fleet is about 17 to 18 inches.

Upgraded legroom options: Delta’s Economy Comfort class offers up to four additional inches of legroom, as well as up to 50 percent additional seat recline on long-haul flights. Business class seats on Delta’s wide-body jets are lie-flat seats and offer up to 80 inches of sleeping space. First Class recliner seats on narrow-body jets have a seat pitch of up to 38 inches.

American Airlines

Standard seat pitch: The majority of American Airlines’ fleet features standard seats with a seat pitch of between 31 and 32 inches.

Standard seat width: For standard seats on most of American Airlines’ aircraft, seats are between 17 and 18 inches wide.

Upgraded legroom options: American Airlines offers a Main Cabin Extra class with up to six additional inches of legroom. Flat-bed seats in Business and First Class offer up to 64 inches of sleeping space, while recliner seats offer a seat pitch of up to 62 inches.

US Airways

Standard seat pitch: The standard seat pitch on the majority of US Airways’ aircraft is 31 to 32 inches.

Standard seat width: Standard seat width on most of US Airways’ aircraft is between 17 and 18 inches.

Upgraded legroom options: Both First Class and Business Class offer additional legroom for passengers. Recliner seats offer a seat pitch of up to 39 inches, while open suites have a seat pitch of up to 49 inches.

AirTran Airways

Standard seat pitch: AirTran is being integrated into Southwest Airlines; currently, its fleet of 717s features a standard seat pitch of up to 30 inches. AirTran’s 737 aircraft have a standard seat pitch of 30 inches. The 737s are being converted into Southwest livery.

Standard seat width: Standard seats are 18 inches wide.

Upgraded legroom options: Both aircraft feature a business class with additional legroom. The 717s have business class seating with a seat pitch of 40 inches, while the 737s have a business class seat pitch of 36 inches.

Alaska Airlines

Standard seat pitch: The standard seat pitch on Alaska Airlines’ fleet is 32 inches on most aircraft.

Standard seat width: The standard seat width throughout Alaska Airlines’ fleet is 17 inches.

Upgraded legroom options: Passengers can book a recliner seat in First Class to enjoy a seat pitch of up to 36 inches and a seat width of 21 inches.

Allegiant Air

Standard seat pitch: Standard seats on Allegiant Air’s MD-80, the most commonly used aircraft in the fleet, offer a seat pitch between 30 and 32 inches. On the airline’s 757 and A319/320 aircraft, seat pitch ranges from 28 to 30 inches.

Standard seat width: Seats on the MD-80s and A319/320s are 18 inches wide, whiles standard seats on Allegiant Air’s 757s are 17.5 inches wide.

Upgraded legroom options: Allegiant Air offers a Legroom+ seating class throughout its fleet, offering a seat pitch of about 34 inches and unobstructed legroom on the MD-80s and A319/320s. On the 757s, passengers can choose between Legroom+ seats with a seat pitch of 34 inches or Giant Seats, which offer unobstructed legroom and a seat width of 25 inches.

Frontier

Standard seat pitch: The standard seat pitch throughout Frontier Airlines’ fleet is 30 to 31 inches.

Standard seat width: On Frontier Airlines’ Airbus A319/320 and Embraer E-190 aircraft, the standard seat width is 18 inches. On the airline’s turboprop aircraft, the standard seat width is 17 inches.

Upgraded legroom options: Frontier Airlines offers a Stretch seating class that includes seats with a minimum seat pitch of 36 inches.

Hawaiian Airlines

Standard seat pitch: The standard seat pitch on Hawaiian Airlines’ aircraft is between 30 and 32 inches.

Standard seat width: Standard seat width on Hawaiian Airlines’ fleet is 18 inches.

Upgraded legroom options: Hawaiian Airlines offers a Preferred Seating class with seats that offer at least five additional inches of legroom.

READ MORE: How to Travel When You’re Not Rich

JetBlue Airways

Standard seat pitch: On JetBlue’s Embraer 190 aircraft, the standard seat pitch varies between 32 and 33 inches. On the airline’s Airbus A320 aircraft, the standard seat pitch is 34 inches.

Standard seat width: Seats on JetBlue’s Airbus A320 aircraft are 17.8 inches wide, while seats on the Embraer 190 aircraft are 18.25 inches wide.

Upgraded legroom options: The Even More Space class offers seating with a seat pitch of at least 38 inches. On the airline’s new Airbus A321, Even More Space seats will feature a seat pitch of up to 41 inches.

Southwest Airlines

Standard seat pitch: On Southwest Airlines’ 737-700 and 737-300 aircraft, the standard seat pitch is 31 inches. On the airline’s 737-800s, the standard seat pitch is 32 inches.

Standard seat width: Standard seats on Southwest Airlines are 17 inches wide.

Upgraded legroom options: Southwest Airlines maintains a single seating class with no pre-assigned seats. Passengers looking for additional legroom during the flight can purchase early boarding access to try to claim the exit row seats first.

Spirit Airlines

Standard seat pitch: Spirit Airlines’ Airbus A320, A319 and A321 aircraft have a standard seat pitch between 28 and 29 inches.

Standard seat width: Standard seats are 17.75 inches wide.

Upgraded legroom options: Each Spirit Airlines aircraft features Big Front Seats, which are located at the front of the cabin and have a seat pitch of 37 inches and a seat width of 20 inches.

Virgin America

Standard seat pitch: In the main cabin, Virgin America offers a standard seat pitch of 32 inches.

Standard seat width: Main cabin seats are 17.7 inches wide.

Upgraded legroom options: For additional legroom, Virgin America passengers can opt for the Main Cabin Select seating class, which offers a seat pitch of 38 inches and width of 19.7 inches. The airline’s First Class cabin has a seat pitch of 55 inches with seats being 21 inches wide.

WestJet

Standard seat pitch: On WestJet’s fleet of 737-600/700/800 aircraft, the standard seat pitch is between 31 and 32 inches. On the airline’s Bombardier Q400 turboprops, the seat pitch is 30 inches.

Standard seat width: Seats are 17 inches wide throughout WestJet’s fleet.

Upgraded legroom options: WestJet’s Economy Plus seating class offers passengers extra legroom with seat pitches of up to 40 inches on its 737s.

Air Canada

Standard seat pitch: Air Canada’s wide-body jets feature standard seat pitches between 30 and 35 inches, depending on aircraft type. Narrow-body jets have a standard seat pitch between 29 and 35 inches.

Standard seat width: Standard seat width ranges between 17 and 18.5 inches on wide-body and narrow-body aircraft.

Upgraded legroom options: Premium Economy is offered on select wide-body jets, offering a seat pitch of up to 38 inches and seat width of up to 20 inches. Business Class seats on wide-body jets are open suite-style with a seat pitch of 70 inches and a width of up to 21 inches. On narrow-body jets, First Class offers seat pitches between 35 and 39 inches with recliner seats on most planes. Seats in First Class are up to 21.1 inches wide.

Porter Airlines

Standard seat pitch: Porter Airlines’ fleet is made of Bombardier Q400 aircraft, in which the standard seat pitch is 32 inches.

Standard seat width: The width from armrest to armrest is 17 inches, while seat cushions are 18 inches.

Upgraded legroom options: Premier seats at the front of the cabin have a seat pitch of 34 inches.

How to get more legroom?

Many airlines offer upgraded economy classes with a few extra inches of legroom. These often include emergency exit row seats and bulkhead seats. While you have to pay for this upgraded seating class, the extra few inches of legroom can be well worth the cost – especially on longer flights. If you don’t purchase an upgraded seating class, you have two options to try to score extra legroom: ask the desk agent upon check-in or at the gate if there is any available seating with extra legroom, or ask the flight attendants if you could be moved to a seat with extra legroom if there is space after you take off. Either way, remember to ask politely and that you won’t be guaranteed extra legroom.

What to do if you don’t have much legroom?

Even if you don’t have a lot of legroom the next time you travel, you don’t have to suffer during the entire flight. Try these tips to stay comfortable:

  • Start your flight off right by wearing loose and comfortable clothing. Restrictive clothing will make your flight a little less comfy.
  • When the seatbelt sign is turned off, use this time to walk to the lavatories and stretch your legs (be careful not to stand in the aisles, as you could block your fellow passengers and flight attendants).
  • Between periods of standing to stretch your legs, you can also stretch out from your seat. Extend your feet, point your toes and flex your arches to keep your legs limber.
  • Switch up how you sit during the flight. For example, don’t keep your legs crossed the same way the entire flight. Instead, shift which leg is crossed on top of the other and try putting both feet flat on the floor. Changing how you sit can improve your circulation during the flight and help ease discomfort.

Lyft Can Now Pick You up at Airport, Lyft Beats Uber to LAX Race

Lyft has beaten Uber in becoming the first ride-sharing company that can take passengers from Los Angeles airport. The service has agreed to pay a $4 fee for every pick-up, and will go live from 8am local time with the city’s mayor, Eric Garcetti, giving his blessing. Lyft may not be as wealthy, or as powerful, as its much bigger rival, but apparently it is much more capable in the whole filling-a-form-in-directly department. An October report from the LA Times revealed that Uber dragged its feet in presenting the airport contract to the city, while Lyft had its paperwork completed by mid-September. It probably won’t be too long before Uber gets approval, but Lyft can chalk this down as a win in the meantime.

Lyft is now allowed at Los Angeles International Airport.

Mayor Eric Garcetti says beginning today, the ride-hailing service will be permitted to make airport pickups. Previously, it could only drop people off.

The company will pay the airport $4 per trip.

In a statement, Lyft executive Bakari Brock says the move is a big step forward for consumers and comes just in time for the holiday season.

A competitor, Uber, won’t be allowed to make pickups until it completes the approval process for a permit.

The City Council voted earlier this year to grant ride-hailing companies the same airport access as taxis, shuttles and limousines.

READ MORE: Uber vs. Lyft – Which One is Better?

what officials hope will be an early Christmas present to harried holiday travelers,Lyft on Wednesday will become the first ride-hailing service to pick up passengers at Los Angeles International Airport.

Earlier this year, Los Angeles officials agreed to allow Lyft and its larger rival, Uber, to apply for permits to work at LAX. Lyft completed its negotiations first, gaining a head start in the potentially lucrative airport market.

Backers say ride-hailing will be a major improvement for passengers at LAX, which, unlike most major air hubs, lacks direct rail service. Those who use the West Coast’s largest airport must contend with gridlocked traffic and pricey parking rates.

When Lyft drivers begin picking up travelers Wednesday morning, officials say it will amount to the biggest change to ground transportation options at the airport since the introduction of shared-ride vans like Super Shuttle in the 1980s.

“We’re doing a lot of work to show that we’re a world-class airport—or at least trying to become one,” said Los Angeles City Councilman Mike Bonin, whose Westside district includes the airport.