What would you do if your child or teenager threw a birthday party, and nobody showed up?

This didn’t happen to my son, but to my younger brother, on his 6th birthday (I was 17).

So my mom handed out every invitation and some parents actually responded and made sure they were going.

The day came and nobody showed up. My mom was furious and my brother was so sad. My mom was busy calling the parents, but I didn’t care about them, to be honest; I just wanted to cheer up my brother.

So I called some of my closest friends, and I told them, it’s my brother’s birthday party, come on over, there’s plenty of food.

In an hour they were there and we had a blast, we jumped in the bouncy house, and I taught my brother how to play FIFA, he opened his presents, and my friends actually got him something on their way. We sang happy birthday and he started crying and hugged me and we blew the candles together.

He forgot all about the people that didn’t show up and he slept like a baby.

Mother’s Day History

Celebrations of mothers and motherhood can be traced back to the ancient Greeks and Romans, who held festivals in honor of the mother goddesses Rhea and Cybele, but the clearest modern precedent for Mother’s Day is the early Christian festival known as “Mothering Sunday.” Once a major tradition in the United Kingdom and parts of Europe, this celebration fell on the fourth Sunday in Lent and was originally seen as a time when the faithful would return to their “mother church”—the main church in the vicinity of their home—for a special service. Over time the Mothering Sunday tradition shifted into a more secular holiday, and children would present their mothers with flowers and other tokens of appreciation. This custom eventually faded in popularity before merging with the American Mother’s Day in the 1930s and 1940s.

The roots of the modern American Mother’s Day date back to the 19th century. In the years before the Civil War (1861-65), Ann Reeves Jarvis of West Virginia helped start “Mothers’ Day Work Clubs” to teach local women how to properly care for their children. These clubs later became a unifying force in a region of the country still divided over the Civil War. In 1868 Jarvis organized “Mothers’ Friendship Day,” at which mothers gathered with former Union and Confederate soldiers to promote reconciliation.

Another precursor to Mother’s Day came from the abolitionist and suffragette Julia Ward Howe. In 1870 Howe wrote the “Mother’s Day Proclamation,” a call to action that asked mothers to unite in promoting world peace. In 1873 Howe campaigned for a “Mother’s Peace Day” to be celebrated every June 2. Other early Mother’s Day pioneers include Juliet Calhoun Blakely, a temperance activist who inspired a local Mother’s Day in Albion, Michigan, in the 1870s. The duo of Mary Towles Sasseen and Frank Hering, meanwhile, both worked to organize a Mothers’ Day in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Some have even called Hering “the father of Mothers’ Day.”

Mother’s Day: Poem Thanking Mom For Everything She’s Done

Sometimes I know the words to say to give thanks for all you’ve done, but then they fly up and away as quickly as they come.

How could I possibly thank you enough, the one who makes me whole, the one to whom I owe my life, the forming of my soul.

The one who tucked me in at night, the one who stopped my crying, the one who was the expert at picking up when I was lying.

The one who saw me off to school and spent sad days alone, yet magically produced a smile as soon as I came home.

The one who makes such sacrifices to always put me first, who lets me test my broken wings, in spite of how it hurts.

Who paints the world a rainbow when it’s filled with broken dreams, who explains it all so clearly when nothing is what it seems.

Are there really any words for this, I find this question tough, anything I want to say just doesn’t seem enough.

What way is there to thank you for your heart, your sweat, your tears, for ten thousand things you’ve done for oh so many years.

For changing with me as I changed, accepting all my flaws, not loving ’cause you had to, but loving just because.

For never giving up on me when your wits had reached its end, for always being proud of me, for being my best friend.

And so I come to realize, the only way to say, the only thank you that’s enough is clear in just one way.

Look at me before you see what I’ve become, do you see yourself in me, the job that you have done?

All your hopes and all your dreams, the strength that no one sees, a transfer over many years, your best was to pass me.

Thank you for the gifts you give, for everything you do, but thank you mommy most of all for making dreams come true.